May Heat For Mother’s Day

May 13, 2018

9pm Sunday

What a scorcher for Mother’s Day!  We not only saw our warmest day of the year so far but our first real “hot day” in the metro area.  PDX hit 90, the first of the season:

Mark PDX Record High Hot

Note it wasn’t a record, most of those are into the 90s this time of year.  As of today, this is the 4th warmest May “so far”…the first 13 days of the month.  I suppose saying it’s the 4th warmest start to May makes a bit more sense.  Tomorrow will be our 2nd hot day since we’ll have weak offshore flow in the morning (except in the south Willamette Valley) changing to an onshore surge of marine air by evening.  In between we should end up somewhere between 87-90 once again.

It’s also amazing how the “faucet” has shut off for almost a month now.  We’ve only seen 0.25″ in Portland in the past 4 weeks!  The last real rainfall here was one month ago…around the 15th/16th of April.  So it’s time to begin watering…much earlier than normal since I don’t see a typical cool/wet pattern setting up over us in the next 7-10 days.  That said, the ECMWF implies we may see widespread showers at some point NEXT week.  You see the green bars start adding up around the 21st or so.

KPDX_2018051312_eps_precip_240

I did see something interesting while on vacation…Hawaiian version of the “weather rock”.  This time it’s a coconut…

lavalava

By the way, VOG (volcanic+fog) is the haze, not real fog, produced by Kilauea volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii and sometimes farther west into the other islands.  It looks/feels similar to our forest fire smoke days, but there’s no smell.  No, I didn’t see any real lava.  I stayed on the west side of the island, a good 2-2.5 hours away from Madame Pele’s fireworks.  I didn’t see any reason to drive that far just to sit at a roadblock and see steam in the distance.  I missed the big quakes too, didn’t feel a thing.

I have to say, it sure is nice to be home.  An 80 degree day blue-sky day in May in the Pacific Northwest beats any tropical location!

Chief Meteorologist Mark Nelsen