Oklahoma City Metro Area Tornadoes

As you all probably know, a huge tornado in the southern suburbs of Oklahoma City this afternoon.  For now it’s been rated at least EF-4.  Town names like Newcastle and Moore probably sound familiar to you if you follow weather.  That’s because a deadly F-5 tore through the same towns 14 years ago this month…May 3, 1999.

How do the paths compare?  I found this image online, but can’t find the source of the info.  I’m not a journalist, just a meteorologist, so I can get by with passing the info on to you as well without checking it’s source.  Looks pretty close to reality though:

nws moor tornado paths

Notice there is one neighborhood that appears to have been hit by both powerful tornadoes…the chance of that happening anywhere on this planet is VERY low.

 

 

22 Responses to Oklahoma City Metro Area Tornadoes

  1. Lurkyloo says:

    Owwww! It got cold!

  2. In Oregon, all new construction has to meet seismic and certain wind shear codes. You’d think that in Tornado Alley, since you can’t effectively build for tornado strength winds, at the very least, all new construction would require a storm shelter/cellar.

    • JJ97222 says:

      Those two schools who took a direct hit had no safe room or shelter, insane especially after the one in 99

  3. JJ97222 says:

    Balmy 47 degrees under the dome the return of winter???

  4. Dave in South Salem (500') says:

    Just starting to snow on the higher passes. Willamette pass for example. Sticking to the ground.

  5. gidrons says:

    The tornado was upped to an EF-5. Thankfully the death toll was revised down, for now.

    SURVEY SUMMARY: EXPERTS SURVEYING IN MOORE HAVE DETERMINED DAMAGE IS
    EF5 WITH MAXIMUM WINDS OVER 200 MPH. FOUR SURVEY TEAMS CONTINUE TO
    INSPECT DAMAGE FROM THIS LONG TRACK TORNADO. INITIAL DAMAGE WAS
    FOUND AROUND 4.4 MILES WEST OF NEWCASTLE…SOUTH OF TECUMSEH ROAD
    ALSO KNOWN AS NW 16TH STREET AND EAST LAKE ROAD. THE TORNADO TRACKED
    NE TO THE INTERSTATE 44 BRIDGE OVER THE CANADIAN RIVER AND THEN TOOK
    A MORE EASTWARD TRACK THROUGH MOORE. TORNADO DAMAGE ABRUPTLY ENDS
    0.3 MILES EAST OF AIR DEPOT ROAD AND N OF SE 134TH ST.

    INITIALLY PRODUCING EF0 AND EF1 DAMAGE THE STORM INTENSIFIED VERY
    RAPIDLY IN 4 MILES OR AROUND 10 MINUTES PRODUCING EF4 DAMAGE BEFORE
    REACHING INTERSTATE 44. NUMEROUS INDICATIONS OF EF4 DAMAGE WITH SOME
    AREAS NOW DETERMINED AT EF5 DAMAGE…THE HIGHEST CATEGORY ON THE EF
    SCALE…WITH OVER 200 MPH WINDS.

  6. It was a great day yesterday, I squeezed in a couple of short hikes!

  7. I knew this was coming, but still? 49 and raining at nearly 1 pm on May 21st.

  8. runrain says:

    Pretty good sunbreaks now. Should aid in the thunderstorm development.

    • JJ97222 says:

      If we get the thunderstorms going here today the t storms will be scattered across the country.

  9. JJ97222 says:

    Nice day so far replaced some deck boards today, now if we can get a dry weekend I can stain them for the new owners, looking good so far on the 7 days!

  10. …i spent part of the day monitoring radar for my kids in missouri…glad to say their worst problem turned out to be excess water…i was glad when that line moved east of them!..

  11. pappoose in scappoose says:

    Oklahoma twister tracked path of 1999 tornado
    By MALCOLM RITTER AP Science Writer Published: May 20, 2013 at 4:39 PM PDT Last Updated: May 20, 2013 at 5:00 PM PDT
    The National Weather Service estimated that the storm that struck Moore, Okla., on Monday had wind speeds of up to 200 mph, and was at least a half-mile wide. The 1999 storm had winds clocked at 300 mph, according to the weather service website, and it destroyed or damaged more than 8,000 homes, killing at least two people.

    Kelsey Angle, a weather service meteorologist in Kansas City, Mo., said it’s unusual for two such powerful tornadoes to track roughly the same path. The 1999 twister was part of a two-day outbreak sweeping mostly across central Oklahoma – similar to the past two days.

    The weather service has tentatively classified the Moore twister’s wind speeds as an EF4 on a 5-point scale. Angle said less than 1 percent of all tornadoes reach EF4 or EF5.

    The thunderstorm developed in an area where warm moist air rose into cooler air. Winds in the area caused the storm to rotate, and that rotation promoted the development of a tornado. The most destructive and deadly tornadoes develop from rotating thunderstorms.

    The biggest known tornado was nearly 2 1/2 miles wide at its peak width, which the weather service describes as near the maximum size for a tornado. It struck Hallam, Neb., in May 2004.

    The deadliest tornado, which struck March 18, 1925, killed 695 people in Missouri, Illinois and Indiana.

    Deaths from twisters have been declining in recent years because of improved forecasts and increased awareness by people living in tornado-prone areas, especially in smaller and rural communities.

    • pappoose in scappoose says:

      Scott Sistek reports:

      Sadly, it’s not the first time Moore has had to deal with such a catastrophic storm. On May 3, 1999, Moore was struck by an EF-5 tornado which recorded the strongest wind speed ever registered near Earth’s surface.

  12. W7ENK says:

    Bad day! 😦

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