Cool & Wet Weather Continues

April 4, 2011

So I come back into town after disappearing to a warmer place the last 10 days, and see that almost nothing has changed.  A cold upper-level trough is digging through the Bering Sea and will arrive overhead later Wednesday.  Ahead of that plenty of rain, then cold showers Wednesday afternoon (along with hail and thunder) with the chilly air.  Once again sticking snow is likely down around 1,500′ either Wednesday and/or Thursday mornings.  Yuck…it’s the first week of April.  I do remember getting 2″ of snow the first week of April at the 700′ elevation I think the spring of 1999 or 2000.  So it’s not unheard of, but unusually cool for sure.

You can see the 6-10 Day upper level outlook/deviation from normal in the map above.  There is no significant change in sight for at least the next 7-9 days as our cool/wet start to Spring rolls on.  One other thing I noticed at home this morning was the startling lack of green on trees and bushes compared to average conditions for early April.  The combination of very late freeze and cold weather in February, then a slightly cooler than average March is really keeping the growing season from kicking into gear.  That’s probably good because this weather pattern is good for late season frosts too.

This is all perfectly normal for a La Nina spring.  In general La Nina springs are cooler than average (more so in May than April).   I checked the last 5 La Nina Aprils and found lots of 70s in 3 out of 5 of those, but 2008 of course was very chilly.  Only 1996 was wet…most La Nina Aprils are a bit on the dry side.  Probably NOT going to be the case this year.

Chief Meteorologist Mark Nelsen


The Weather Blog is Back

April 4, 2011

Oops…sorry about that.  I forgot that WordPress only allows comments for 10 days after a post so that’s why it suddenly shut off Saturday.

So, here’s a quick one to freshen things up: 

It looks exactly the same outside as it did the morning I left 10 days ago.  It’s still cold and wet…

I’ll be back at work this afternoon.

Chief Meteorologist Mark Nelsen