The Hot Temps

July 8, 2010

Here are the “official” high temps around town today.  These are the NWS/FAA locations with ASOS sensors.  They are all well-sited out in the open and away from “heat sources”.  There is a common problem with home weather sensors (including mine with gets a bit too much morning sun).  It’s really hard to measure temperature correctly and it’s very easy to get too hot of a temperature.  You generally don’t get “too high” of a windspeed or “too much rain”, but temperature is a different creature.  If your temperature was more than 2-3 degrees from these you probably have your thermometer in a warm place, or it just might read warm in general. Your sensors must be away from pavement, walls, roofs, decks etc…keep in mind that one of those objects/surfaces 20 feet “upwind” can give you the same effect.  I see the “Rivergrove” on MADIS and “Liberal” were 112 and 108!  Those are extreme examples.  But I see one location in Washington County where two sensors read 97 & 98 and then another one nearby was 102.

One other thing to keep in mind; I notice most home weather sensors mention in the specs that the resolution could vary 1-2 degrees…another reason to always check yours against an official location near your home.


No Record So Far, but Hot!

July 8, 2010

An appropriate picture for today don’t you think?  This is Maximus (seems appropriately named), the 166 lb. dog jumping into the sprinkler water stream.  This is what summer is all about!  Thanks to Melissa Lapuyade-Gonzales. 

As of 5pm, the high temperature at PDX was 97.  BUT, that’s also the current temp…seems very likely we’ll notch up at least one more degree between now and 7pm.  I’m guessing 98 or 99 degree high in the end.  Hot!

Some buildups over the Cascades to the southeast.  Closest lightning strikes have been over Santiam Pass.

Chief Meteorologist Mark Nelsen


Hottest Day Today

July 8, 2010

Everything still on track for a very hot day today…upper atmosphere has warmed a bit, plus offshore flow is still lingering over the Cascades.  That easterly wind is much weaker this morning, so a widespread easterly wind is not in the cards for the metro area, but the effect will still be there to maximize heating.  I notice Corbett was the warm spot last night…it didn’t get below 70 degrees last night with the wind keeping the air stirred up.  That’s quite a turnaround considering a few days ago they had a tough time even getting ABOVE 60 degrees for a high!

A few obvious changes today will make it feel hotter: lack of wind for one, and then take a look at the picture above.  Low clouds have pushed inland as far as the Longview/Kelso areas.  That with the loss of the dry wind from the east means signficantly higher dewpoints; it’s going to be more humid.

You can see some thunderstorm leftovers in the South Oregon Cascades…I doubt that moisture makes it farther north than the Three Sisters today…but some good action down around Crater Lake!

Chief Meteorologist Mark Nelsen